In a Vase on Monday – Beans

I’ve been picking drying beans for the last few days and shucking them to store as they get nice and crunchy. It’s a therapeutic task for a while, but then gets tedious, so I do them in batches. I love how shiny they are, straight out of the pods (except of the black runner beans which seem to need a quick rub before they twinkle).

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Shiny!

I find their variations marvellous and I can’t seem to stop myself arranging them into patterns and pictures.

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So I began to think that I might layer them in a glass vase, like those test-tubes that you pay to fill with the multi-colour sands at Alum Bay on the Isle of Wight.

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I think that they look quite fetching.

So which beans did I grow this year? At the bottom of the vase there are runners (Painted Lady), then a purple climbing bean (Trionfo Voiletto), next a heritage climbing bean (Blue and White), followed by another climber ‘Cherokee Trail of Tears’:vas2

And in the top half (from bottom up again) there’s a dwarf french bean ‘Yin Yang’ or ‘Orca’, underneath a white butterbean called ‘Czar’, then on top of that there’s a pea bean from Garden Organic, topped up with a black runner bean breed by Dick Sanders (a lecturer at College of West Anglia).

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I like them all, but am pleased with my first time crop of heritage pea beans, which are two-tone: a beautiful blood red and cream colour. They look similar to some of the cowpeas I’ve been thinking of trying on the Baker Creek Heirloom Seed website.

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So that is our vase for the week. I wonder how long  I can resist shaking them.

I am joining in with Cathy’s ‘In a Vase on Monday’ and I hope that a vase of beans isn’t too far off the reservation. Take a look at her lovely autumnal vase and check out the links to other contributions in the comments section.

 

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About Frogend_dweller

Living in the damp middle of nowhere
This entry was posted in Food, Nature, The home garden, Vegetables and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

24 Responses to In a Vase on Monday – Beans

  1. Chloris says:

    How original. I love freshly podded beans too. I grow borlotti beans simply because they look so pretty. What a lovely idea layering them in a glass container so you can enjoy looking at them as well as eating them.

    • I usually grow borlotti too, also largely for their beauty while they grow. I think I must have overlooked them this year in my zeal to grow some new things. I love the look of layered produce in jars. One Christmas we were given a glass container filled with layers of brightly coloured pickled chillis. We never ate them, though the jar did decorate the mantlepiece for two or three years!

  2. Sam says:

    These look lovely – great idea. I haven’t grown any beans this year as we were away for a while. Maybe next year 🙂

    • I find beans really rewarding, but definitely difficult to grow if you hop off to the States! I always mean to dig one of those compost trenches in advance of planting the beans, to help them grow stong and preserve moisture, but I never remember in time.

  3. Cathy says:

    My goodness – I am amazed at the range of beans you have grown (and presumably successfully) – aren’t they beautiful? And what an original idea for a vase – SO effective, although somehow they look as if they are chocolate covered nuts and raisins…mmm! Thanks for sharing

  4. Creative and lovely display in contrasting legumes. I want to cook some beans now.

  5. Gillian says:

    Beautiful Beans! Isn’t nature amazing?

  6. Eliza Waters says:

    I love this! Best vase this week in the originality category! 😉 I grew orca beans this year – only four plants survived, but it was enough to fill a jar. I love looking at them. 🙂

  7. Cathy says:

    What a novel idea for a vase! I can quite understand the fascination after seeing them displayed like this. 🙂

  8. What fun! I like those black and white ones the best.

  9. What a fabulous collection of beans, polished or not, they look so beautiful in the canisters. If I had such a wonderful range I’d spend time making patterns with them too.

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