Six on Saturday – Running just to keep still

14/03/2020

With various things being cancelled over the last week I’ve managed to escape to the garden a bit more than usual, which has been brilliant. And Lord knows, it needs the attention, but somehow I’ve struggled to get things done. The square-metre pond suddenly developed a leak again and I’ve had to spend time transferring rain-butt water to it, via a watering can, to keep the fish happy while I find the problem. Various batteries turned out to be flat, which delayed lawn cutting and hedge-trimming. However, as a result of the leylandii tidy-up process, we’ve decided to bite the bullet and get someone in to remove the ugly things completely. (We didn’t plant them and neither of us like them, but they have screened our very close neighbours’ house and external pipework very well.) Re-working the area can include further pond changes, so it is all good. I anticipated plenty of plant purchasing opportunities!!!

There is so much stuff going on in the garden it has been straightforward to find things for #SixonSaturday, the weekly gardening show-and-tell, ably hosted by Jonathon on The Propagator’s blog. So here we go …

1) Loropetalum 

My Mum asked me what I bought with my Christmas money, so I felt obliged to go look for something specific to report back. I had mentally flagged this plant at Kew (in the Temperate house) years ago, so when I spotted this one (Loropetalum chinense ‘Black Pearl’) at our local garden centre I did not resist. It goes perfectly in the patio border.

sosloro

I am in love with Loropetalum jasminoides ‘Black Pearl’

2) Lace edge primula

I love the old-fashioned look of gold-lace primulas and find myself buying one most years. Then they seem to disappear and never return. Well, I’ve finally found a spot that seems to suit them. They’ve come back and doubled in size, so I’ve bought two more. This one is very nearly black.

soslace

Nearly black, très chic

3) Echium pininana

Two years ago I grew a tree echium (to celebrate our time lived in the Canaries) and when I found lots of little babies growing all over the same area last year I mostly left them alone. Well, they’ve survived the winter and storms (fingers-crossed I don’t jinx things) and I now have a small echium forest at the end of the driveway. Yesterday when I checked on them I noticed that they have started to put on new growth and produce side shoots.  It looks like they may well be flowering soon.

sosechium

Echium is looks like it is forming flowers already

4) The pear blossom is imminent

Everything is getting away so quickly now. Damson is in flower now. Take time to sniff it if you can (you’ll thank me, honest!). The pear blossom is swelling:

sospear

Pear tree is budding up nicely

… And then it will be apple time. My favourite.

5) Daffodil variations

These were a mistake. I don’t know what they are (and I can’t say I care, except to avoid them again). They came in one of those free mixed packs of bulbs you get when you spend over a certain amount. I planted the mixture in patches in the meadow area and every year when they bloom I find myself cutting them to get rid of them, but then I can’t bear to throw them away. In fact, they look best in a vase, providing the froth to other more serious things.

sosdaffs

Daft daffodils. Top heavy and over-bred?

6) Seed sowing

Seed sowing is in full swing and all our windowsills and greenhouse shelves are already full. Where will the pricked out stuff go? How are you doing with it?

Also, if I check the pots one more time today I will officially call myself sad  😉

This pot is my first time growing Pandorea jasminoides. I saw it growing in our holiday villa in France last summer. Its pale pink flowers are really lovely (like a huge thunbergia). Happily the seeds germinated very quickly. Fingers-crossed that they get to flowering stage in England.

sospandorea

Pandorea jaminoides

So that is my lot. What spring/autumn wonders are you enjoying?

About Frogend_dweller

Living in the damp middle of nowhere
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15 Responses to Six on Saturday – Running just to keep still

  1. Eliza Waters says:

    I love those dark primulas. Sadly, we don’t see these beauties much here, just those garish ones you get in the grocery stores, ugh.

  2. prue batten says:

    Being a ‘white’ gardener, opting for grey and black accents, I’m in love with your primula. Noting the name to try and locate…

  3. fredgardener says:

    Wow! That dark primula is gorgeous.
    I also grow the same echium ( but from seeds ) and the growth is fast . I will have to wait next summer to see them bloom.
    Last thing, these Pandorea jasminoides yours plants are full of promise. I hope you can get flowers where you live.

    • If we have a summer like last year I am hopeful about the bower vine. I think I am a bit addicted to towering echiums, ‘cos I am trying a couple of other types this year too. Good luck with yours, yes, it probably depends on next winter!

  4. pbmgarden says:

    I wouldn’t mind a few of your daffodils. Take care and enjoy your time in the garden.

  5. shoreacres says:

    Just today I posted an oddity that’s your normal on Lagniappe — I found some variety of narcissus and snowflakes growing in the Rockport cemetery! I rarely see the narcissus, although they’re around, but I had seen exactly one snowflake in my entire life. I was thrilled beyond words. Thank goodness for the beauty and restorative qualities of nature.

    I’ve never seen anything like that primula, either. I sat and looked and looked at it. My goodness, what a beauty!

  6. I’m wondering where all the seedlings are going to go come potting on time too! The gold-lace primula is very striking indeed.

  7. Chloris says:

    I love the laced primulas, they don’t always last so that is a result. I bought a lorepetalum last year and kept it in the greenhouse as I wasn’t sure how hardy they are. Maybe I will risk it outside too. I have lots of daffodils that I would never dream of planting but even the fussy, ruffled ones do look lovely in a vase

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